Jump to content

Old D&D e i "nuovi" giocatori


TartaRosso
 Share

Recommended Posts

https://plus.google.com/117301572585814320386/posts/VGrEHakDC9g

Al link sopra potete trovare una discussione di ben Lehman (autore di polaris, bliss stage, hot guys making out, about the ecology of mud dragons, the drifter's escape; gli faccio un po' di pubblicità perché i suoi giochi mi piacciono :) ) sull'approccio dei giocatori nati ludicamente dagli anni 90 in poi alle vecchi versioni di d&d.

Purtroppo non posso ricopiare il testo da cellulare ma se qualcuno vuole farlo e incollarlo in un post qui sotto è il benvenuto.

Anche se il post parlava di old d&d mi è sembrato fosse meglio metterlo in discussioni generiche vista l'ampiezza dell'argomento.

Inviato dal mio MK16i con Tapatalk 2

Link to comment
Share on other sites


I wrote a thing about how to play Basic D&D (based on Moldvay ed but any form of Basic D&D) for +Tim Koppang and I thought it might be of interest to others.

This is my guide to surviving levels 1-3 of Basic D&D (hereafter I will just call the game D&D: understand I'm referring to this one specifically and not one of the many other D&Ds.)

Preliminaries

Playing D&D is a skill. If you are not good at the necessary skills, the game will punish you by killing your characters. What I can do here is point you in the direction of what skilled play looks like. That isn't the same thing as teaching those skills, for which we would actually have to play the game together, but it can hopefully give you ideas about what to try.

My assumption in this piece is that the biggest stumbling block to D&D is the combat, rather than traps or mapping or so on. Obviously, there is different advice for different problems. But I have noticed that combat is the problem that 90% of modern gamers have with playing D&D.

Core Principles

The combat system of D&D is a punishment mechanic, not a reward mechanic. You do not want to get into a fight. Particularly as a 1st level character, fights will kill you dead. Every single attack roll has a fairly decent chance of killing you. Thus, you want to avoid being subject to attack rolls, by whatever means.

If you look at the D&D reward mechanic (experience points and treasure) this is obvious. You can orders of magnitude more experience points from treasure collection than you do from combat (monster killing). XP from combat plays basically no role in advancement whatsoever. Your approach to a dungeon should thus be surgical, rather than exhaustive: get in, get as much treasure as you can, and get out. You do not have to confront the dungeon on its own terms and, indeed, doing so will kill you.

As a player of modern (tabletop or video) games, this can be a hard adaptation to make. You have been trained through long experience to "clean out" dungeons and to treat combat as a resource expenditure (spend some hit points to pass the monster) rather than an out-and-out losing condition. However, D&D is not a game of resource management nearly as much as it is a game of creativity. Creatively navigating your environment is the only possible key to success.

Implications

There are a number of implications from the two core principles. I'll go over a few of my favorites.

Establish the Fiction The DM will naturally keep her descriptions fairly vague and nebulous, both because this is easier and it is of course clear in her head. Do not let her get away with this. Ask questions about your character's environment, about the exact spacing, about the exact locations. This is useful for two reasons: one, it will reveal potential resources and opportunities, and two if combat breaks out it will give your the proper spacing.

Jam Today is better than Jam Tomorrow. Listen up wizards. You've got your one sleep spell, and god-damn it you're going to save it because without it you're useless. So you hang on and then, bam, stray arrow gets you. You have made the classic error of delaying your gratification. Do not do this. Use whatever resources you have at your disposal right now before you're too dead to use them at all. If you run out of resources, retreat and regroup ASAP. You will not get through the early levels of D&D by being parsimonious with your victories.

Talk, Run, and Wait When you encounter a monster, you have four options: Fight, Talk, Run and Wait. This is not for show. This is the game giving you a last chance to avoid doing something stupid. If you have any possibility of avoiding combat with the non "fight" options, do it. This means, yes, you should pay attention to what languages your character speaks, as well as the internal politics (if any) of the dungeon. A character-killing fight could turn into an opportunity or a reward.

Prefer Cleverness to Arrows, Arrows to Swords If you can find a way to avoid a fight, do it. Light a bonfire and smoke out the goblins. Don't molest the Flesh Golem in the attic. Roll a boulder in front of the cave mouth and keep moving. However, if a fight is a must, try to engage on your terms: i.e. at range. Most early D&D monsters don't have ranged attacks, so engaging at range will give you a huge advantage. Note that bow ranges are much larger than the movement rate of most early monsters, so don't let the DM get away with "just one round of arrow fire then they close." Consult the rules, and keep in mind to establish the fiction.

Use your equipment, use the environment More than just a ten foot pole, everything on the equipment list is insanely valuable for navigating the dungeon. Get lots of oil and set things on fire, for instance, or use a mirror on a pole to look around corners. Anything in the dungeon, up to and including the walls, can be leveraged for your advantage.

Take your time Do not hastily move through the dungeon. As much as possible, take your time, secure retreat routes, and don't let the DM rattle you. Remember: there is always another dungeon. Don't take risks that aren't both calculated and absolutely necessary.

Conclusion

I feel like there's a huge culture shock being exposed to D&D for the first time. A lot of video gamers, Forgies / Story Gamers, and players of modern forms of D&D are used to the game's mechanics being their friends, to being able to leave the fiction in a muddled cloud, and to not having to actually struggle to succeed in a game. It's tempting to just go "this game is broken" or "this game is not to my tastes," and that's totally cool. However, there's a huge depth of game there, that includes serious respect for the fictional space in a way few other games replicate, and I think it is worthwhile -- for game design education if nothing else -- to play it aggressively and appropriately and see where it leads you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Decisamente molto interessante, fa rivalutare di gran lunga alcuni aspetti dei giochi più "moderni", compresi alcuni dei suoi...anche se l'idea di fondo per me rimane quella di usare il ruleset che si addice di più non a quello che ci piace, ma a quello che vogliamo fare (come ambientazione e tipo di gioco).

Nei vari commenti sul documento poi, tratta alcuni aspetti psicologici perfino inerenti la scheda del pg, magari tralasciando l'idea che quando d&d è stato creato, di quella roba non sapevano nulla e l'han fatta così la scheda perchè sembrava loro ordinata e comoda, tutto qua :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

L'analisi fatta parte da un presupposto errato.

I combattimenti erano mortali: vero. Troppo mortali, e questo era un errore.

I combattimenti potevano/dovevano essere evitati: falso. Un DM non ti avrebbe mai dato un tesoro senza che tu te lo fossi guadagnato (far sudare i giocatori è/era un principio del gioco).

Era più che normale combattere e morire, infatti era più che normale cambiare molti PG e portarsene dietro di scorta per cambiarli a metà sessione o usare seguaci, mercenari e altra carne da macello.

Ora lui dice che la mortalità nei combattimenti fosse voluta e che i combattimenti dovessero essere evitati. Fosse vero il gioco si sarebbe concentrato su regole per evitare questi mostri, cosa che invece non è. Non solo mancavano totalmente molte regole, tipo quelle di interazione (diplomazia, ingannare etc) ma quelle che c'erano erano totalmente inefficienti (tipo nascondersi: ti vedevano subito). Invece ci sono abbondanti regole per combattere... chissà perché? ed i mostri sono divisi per livello, sempre più pericolosi ma con tesori sempre più ricchi... chissà perché? e eprché mettere tutta quella varietà di mostri se tanto dovevano essere solo evitati?

I PX si prendono principalmente per i soldi guadagnati... certo, era un altro errore di progettazione, ma tanto per guadagnarli devi sconfiggere il mostro quindi non era grave.

Ora le cose sono due: o si accetta che la mortalità elevata e il reward sistem siano errori o si accetta che tutte le altre regole siano errori.

Ben Lehman ha optato per la seconda. Eppure basta leggere svogliatamente i manuali per capire che i combattimenti sono previsti eccome!

Il gioco inizialmente era un dungeon crawl, hack&slash, EUMATE e non per niente deriva da un WARgame. Solo successivamente i giocatori hanno visto che c'erano modi più divertenti per giocarlo ed hanno cominciato a chiedere altre regole, regole per interagire e non solo per combattere, e porre più attenzione al background del PG, all'ecologia del dungeon etc etc. In questo modo sono nate le nuove edizione, che pur con i loro difetti, sono certamente migliori di quei prototipi arcaici, alla faccia della old school renaissance.

Decisamente molto interessante, fa rivalutare di gran lunga alcuni aspetti dei giochi più "moderni", compresi alcuni dei suoi...

sicuramente è un caso

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Opinioni tue, che per quanto mi riguarda partono da assunti decisamente sbagliati, ma ognuno la vede come vuole.

Certo, lui è soltanto un povero game designer di successo, noi siamo i giocatori invece...

Comunque, rivalutare alcuni nuovi ruleset, non vuol dire rivalutarli (come credo intenda tu) in modo solo positivo, o anche solo negativo, significa riflettere su alcune cose e alcuni meccanismi perversi che sono usciti fuori negli anni e che nell'old school in realtà erano scontati e facevano parte del gioco di ruolo (non dirò interpretazione perchè è riduttivo rispetto al termine gdr...), ad esempio l'utilità di una "regola" per gestire le interazioni...prima si interpretavano e il master decideva in autonomia il risultato, et voilà, nessuna necessità di raggirare/intimidire/diplomazia e cacchiate simili.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Opinioni tue, che per quanto mi riguarda partono da assunti decisamente sbagliati, ma ognuno la vede come vuole.

Certo, lui è soltanto un povero game designer di successo, noi siamo i giocatori invece...

Comunque, rivalutare alcuni nuovi ruleset, non vuol dire rivalutarli (come credo intenda tu) in modo solo positivo, o anche solo negativo, significa riflettere su alcune cose e alcuni meccanismi perversi che sono usciti fuori negli anni e che nell'old school in realtà erano scontati e facevano parte del gioco di ruolo (non dirò interpretazione perchè è riduttivo rispetto al termine gdr...), ad esempio l'utilità di una "regola" per gestire le interazioni...prima si interpretavano e il master decideva in autonomia il risultato, et voilà, nessuna necessità di raggirare/intimidire/diplomazia e cacchiate simili.

Le regole sull'interazione servono principalmente per giustificare l'esistenza del carisma come caratteristica seno sarebbe stata parzialmente inutile

sul fatto che i combat potevano essere evitati è vero visto che i mostri erano ingannabili ed aggirabili tramite qualche astuto truccheto (uso creativo delle meccaniche no,è) certo qualcuno critica perché si sono 20mila regole sul combattimento ed malapena 2 per il resto perché è un difetto concettuale dei giochi tradizionali perché il combat è una situazione complessa ed anche per via della sua eredita da Wargame tutto qui:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Opinioni tue, che per quanto mi riguarda partono da assunti decisamente sbagliati, ma ognuno la vede come vuole.

l'ho già detto:

o si accetta che la mortalità elevata e il reward sistem siano errori o si accetta che tutte le altre regole siano errori.

E' più facile sbagliare due regole (tra l'altro una è in concordanza con i wargame da cui il gioco deriva) o mille?

E una frase del tipo: quando i PG uccidono i mostri il DM deve pensare a ripopolare il dungeon non implica forse che i PG uccidano i mostri? sai trovarmene una dove dice: quando i PG imbrogliano i mostri questi al prossimo giro saranno... più/meno semplici da fregare?

Inoltre delle opinioni se ne discute motivandole (come ho fatto io) altrimenti il discorso diventa banale.

Affermare che il gioco non preveda di combattere ma dia regole qualsi solo esclusivamente tese a combattere significa dare al game designer dell'incapace (per usare un eufemismo).

ad esempio l'utilità di una "regola" per gestire le interazioni...prima si interpretavano e il master decideva in autonomia il risultato, et voilà, nessuna necessità di raggirare/intimidire/diplomazia e cacchiate simili

si, funzionava proprio così, ma c'è da chiedersi il perché. Se quelle cose fossero state il sunto del gioco, come dice erroneamente Ben Lehman, si avrebbe avuto meno regole per i combattimenti (che tanto non avvenivano) e più regole per l'interazione (o almeno questo è ciò che avrebbe fatto qualsiasi designer sano di mente).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Senza polemica eh, ma spiegami da quale tesi esce fuori la tua ipotesi iniziale

Troppo mortali, e questo era un errore.

Questo dipende soltanto da come gioca il master e da come i giocatori percepiscono ciò che fanno...non c'è una "regola" che impone una certa mortalità, nè il manuale dice al master di mettere di fronte ai pg certe creature piuttosto che altre (e già qui cade tutto l'impianto accusatorio), anzi, dice proprio l'opposto, ossia di creare un dungeon, e per estensione un'avventura e una campagna, sensati.

Di fatto, segnalando proprio questo tipo di costruzione al master, già il manuale ti sta dicendo di trovare altre possibili soluzioni al semplice scontro, specialmente contro alcuni avversari in particolare.

Altro fatto: sappiamo tutti che D&D è nato da un wargame, ma chi l'ha creato 40 anni fa (non ieri, 40 anni eh...un tempo dove ancora i game designer non esistevano, dato che non c'era un business dietro), secondo voi, intendeva creare un'altro wargame, oppure aveva in mente qualcosa di diverso?

Siccome la risposta mi pare ovvio sia la seconda, paragonare il gioco per alcune sue meccaniche prese in prestito da un wargame, mi sembra quantomeno sciocco, come a dire che, per estensione, skyrim è un wargame molto fatto male e giocabile in uno schermo. C'è una grossa differenza anche fra meccaniche di gioco (un insieme di regole che consente di gestire una determinata serie di eventi) e regole che impostino certe parti di gioco, e laddove il combattimento necessita di una meccanica, di una serie di regole che lo disciplinino, per le interazioni non ce n'è assolutamente bisogno. E' peraltro fittizio credere che un gioco come, ad esempio, la 3a edizione e i due cloni 3.5 e pathfinder, abbiano all'interno una meccanica che disciplina le interazioni fra personaggi, dato che la cosiddetta CD viene scelta dal master, in base a ciò che ritiene corretto per l'occasione, ovvero il master decide se e quanto per il gruppo è possibile ottenere un risultato: se la CD scelta è alta, sarà difficile riuscire, se è bassa, sarà più o meno facile...se sostituissimo il tiro di dado con una monetina 50%/ 50%, il risultato di una simile meccanica di gioco sarebbe praticamente identico (unica differenza ovviamente, saranno i valori statistici, ma non il metodo.)

Quello che trovavo interessante nel suo commento, e in quelli a seguire che avevano postato, era invece il fatto che quella logica di tentare di evitare lo scontro, è venuta a mancare totalmente nelle nuove edizioni, anzi, molto peggio esiste una meccanica all'interno dei nuovi regolamenti (e ci sarà anche nel next da quel che ho capito) per cui gli scontri si costruiscono in modo che i pg siano SEMPRE in grado di affrontarli, realtà ben lontana dal vero gioco di ruolo, dove non sempre le situazioni dovrebbero essere affrontabili dai pg.

Infine, giusto per far capire quanto sia inutile (e a volte controproducente, come per le abilità intimidire/raggirare o peggio per l'onnipresente percezione) inserire regole per qualsiasi evento si ritenga importante in gioco, non mi risulta esistano ad esempio strumenti per gestire il commercio di qualsiasi tipo, neppure spesso a livello di ambientazione.

Eppure, tutti i pg prima o poi comprano qualcosa...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alla fine le abilita sociali(come la altre come la percezione) servono per risolvere il conflit che consiste semplicemente se hai fregato ho no il giocatore o per dire quanto sei bravo ha fare quella cosa perché oggi trovami un giocatore che accetta un fallimento automatico della prova sociale o percezione solo perché al master gli girava così senza manco tirare?

Infine certi la cosa delle abilita potrebbe essere ruolate certo per le abilita sociali potrebbe anche funzionare e per le culturali parzialmente perché si deve evitare di fare metagame ma già nel ambito di abilita fisiche non c'e ruolagio che tenga.

Poi se critichi certe abilita come quelle sociali e quelle che si basano sulla percezione allora dovresti rivedere pesantemente l'utilità ed il ruolo di certe caratteristiche collegate ha quelle abilita come il carisma(sta molto massacrata dal gioco ma che si salva grazie ha regole tutte sue) per le prime ed la saggezza(idem come sopra ma già un po' meglio solo per il tiro salvezza sulla volontà) per le seconde seno hai fini del gioco tali stat ha che servirebbe ha parte qualche regola speciale che al massimo userai hai alti livelli come quella del attrarre seguaci?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Per capire quale fosse lo spirito dei creatori del gioco non basterebbe guardare lo spazio dedicato sui manuali al combattimento e all' evitare il combattimento?

Il set di regole più vecchio che conosco è quello di AD&D (poco) e AD&D 2 (un pò di più) e direi che lo spazio dedicato al combattimento fosse preponderante su tutto il resto, arrivando a vette di approfondimento delle meccaniche ben pù profonde della 3.5.

Non parlo solo di spazio regolistico ma anche di supporto, in poche parole di pagine dedicate e di cura nel trattarle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ora non ho tempo di commentare per bene (spero di poterlo fare dopo è spiegarmi per bene) ma il fatto che d&d agli albori venisse giocato così mi sembrava abbastanza assodato. O meglio l'ho letto più volte in inglese su siti che parlvano della storia di d&d. Purtroppo ora non saprei ritrovare tutti i riferimenti (e non ne avrei neanche il tempo) ma se cercate su internet con pazienza un po' di roba dovreste trovarla.

Per quanto riguarda ad&d in questo articolo non sì parla di quel gioco. Basta fare un po' di ricerche su internet per scoprire quanta differenza corra fra i primi d&d e ad&d anche solo in termini di manuale (che poi le regole di base siano simili questo è vero ma come sì sa il diavolo sì nasconde nei dettagli).

Inviato dal mio MK16i con Tapatalk 2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sì mi ero accorto che faceva riferimento in maniera esplicita solo ai primi tre livelli di basic D&D, però temporalmente parlando AD&D non era tanto distante e quindi non mi sembrava inopportuno portarlo come esempio di un regolamento che in maniera implicita indica una priorità del combattimento sulla mediazione e la furtività.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

eh? corrono 10 anni fra il manuale in questione e quello del master di AD&D.

Come si fa a giudicare un gioco sulla base di quanto organicamente è stato creato per una parte di esso rispetto ad altre? Volete dirmi che alcuni giochi, che hanno i mostri all'interno del manuale principale (come cthulhu) sono creati per mettere in gioco solo i mostri?

Io trovo che alcuni passaggi di quanto ha scritto l'autore siano condivisibili, del resto molti giochi in fase di elaborazione ormai si dirigono verso un'approccio decisamente più old school rispetto ai loro recenti predecessori.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

D&D e AD&D sono giochi molto diversi. Pensare di poter parlare di D&D perché si consce un po' di AD&D è un errore.

Io ho iniziato D&D con l'edizione Mentzer. Quando si comincia l'avventura introduttiva del manuale del DM, si trova una raccomandazione al DM stesso: imparare bene le regole sul tiro di reazione e sul morale, prima di iniziare. Già questo dovrebbe far capire che la lotta all'ultimo sangue contro i mostri sia solo l'extrema ratio.

I manuali hanno una parte dedicata al combattimento. Essa è molto limitata - d'altronde il combattimento stesso è semplicissimo. Poi ci sono parti sulla creazione del personaggio, sulle classi, sull'equipaggiamento (che ha una lista molto più ampia per gli oggetti mondani che per armi e armature), sul movimento. E delle ampie liste di incantesimi, solo alcuni dei quali hanno a che fare con il combattimento. Il disco fluttuante di Tenser, i muri di pietra, l'invisibilità (no, niente invisibilità "superiore" in D&D), lo charme, il blocca porta, sono tutti incantesimi che hanno mille usi in dungeon, e ammazzare i mostri non è compreso tra essi. Naturalmente ci sono anche incantesimi direttamente legati al combattimento come la palla di fuoco, la pioggia di meteore e i vari cura ferite.

Il manuale del DM parla diffusamente di come progettare un dungeon, di come gestirlo, di ricompense; ci sono tabelle di tesori e schede di mostri. Ci sono le trappole. Ci sono le regole di cui sopra sul morale e sulla reazione. Ci sono riferimenti al fatto che i mostri apprendono dall'esperienza e che una tattica che funziona una volta (usare una fiasca d'olio per creare una barriera di fiamme) non è detto che funzioni una seconda.

Tutto questo è nel set base. Dire che la maggior parte delle regole è dedicata al combattimento è una grande inesattezza. E' inesatto anche dire che sia difficile nascondersi: quello che è difficile è nascondersi nelle ombre ovvero nascondersi laddove non ci sia un nascondiglio. Se vogliamo parlare di errore di game design, a questo riguardo, dobbiamo riferirci esclusivamente alle percentuali delle abilità del ladro, davvero troppo basse a parte la capacità di scalare i muri.

L'articolo di Ben Lehman è molto sintetico. Esprime delle conclusioni e le mette in relazione allo stile di gioco di diverse generazioni. Non parla delle fonti di queste conclusioni, che sono (palesemente) un vecchio articolo di Luke Crane e un decennio di discussioni sul web. Queste discussioni hanno coinvolto a più riprese i giocatori di D&D degli anni '70 e molti del gruppo originario; gente che giocava con Gygax e Arneson, oppure giocatori indipendenti della prima ora. Altra fonte sono state le giocate fatte alle convention moderne, masterate da vari autori e pionieri di D&D. Lo stile di gioco che viene fuori tra questi pionieri è sempre quello a cui fa riferimento Ben Lehman.

Da nessuna parte dell'articolo si dice che "il gioco non preveda di combattere". Si dice invece che il combattimento è previsto ed è molto letale. Che il reward system e questa altissima mortalità stimolino la ricerca di soluzioni alternative al combattimento. E la maggior parte del regolamento - interazioni sociali, equipaggiamento, incantesimi eccetera - verte proprio sulla ricerca di soluzioni alternative (e creative).

Questo nell'edizione Mentzer. L'edizione Moldvay a cui fa riferimento Ben Lehman (e prima di lui Luke Crane) non la conosco; stando a quanto affermava Crane, in tale edizione lo scopo del gioco e gli strumenti per per conseguirlo sono ancora più chiari ed espliciti.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Senza polemica eh, ma spiegami da quale tesi esce fuori la tua ipotesi iniziale

Questo dipende soltanto da come gioca il master e da come i giocatori percepiscono ciò che fanno

Che fosse molto mortale non è solo una mia ipotesi, ma anche di Ben Lehman. Che fosse troppo mortale invece è una mia ipotesi, ma giustamente come dici te dipende dai gusti, quindi vediamole:

1) per alcuni sarà troppo mortale e quindi riterranno quelle regole fatte male e tenteranno di non combattere

2) per altri quella mortalità sarà divertente e quindi combatteranno senza farsi problemi a cambiare Pg ogni 3x2

3) altri ancora accetteranno quella mortalità ma tenteranno di non combattere

in tutti e tre i casi il discorso non cambia: si vede perfettamente che il gioco è stato fatto per affrontare combattimenti e non certo per evitarli, visto che ci sono regole molte per combattere (giuste o errate che siano) e nessuna (o quasi) per evitarli.

O si accetta che la mortalità elevata e il reward sistem siano errori feature o si accetta che tutte le altre regole siano errori.

non c'è una "regola" che impone una certa mortalità, nè il manuale dice al master di mettere di fronte ai pg certe creature piuttosto che altre (e già qui cade tutto l'impianto accusatorio), anzi, dice proprio l'opposto, ossia di creare un dungeon, e per estensione un'avventura e una campagna, sensati.

ti sbagli in tutto.

Per cominciare "l'impianto accusatorio" non ha affatto bisogno che vi sia mortalità, al contrario è l'ipotesi di Ben Lehman che ne ha bisogno: il gioco è mortale => quindi non era pensato per combattere, dice lui. Che sia mortale o meno prevede combattimenti perché le regole parlano di quelli, dico io.

In secondo luogo non è vero che il manuale non dia indicazioni sulla mortalità. I dungeon sono divisi per livelli sempre più difficili e sempre più ricchi. I tesori trovati (e quindi i PX) sono legati alla mortalità dei mostri.

E per finire l'ecologia del dungeon è appena accennata. E' successivamente, quando il gioco diventa più maturo, che se ne parla maggiormente.

sappiamo tutti che D&D è nato da un wargame, ma chi l'ha creato 40 anni fa (non ieri, 40 anni eh...un tempo dove ancora i game designer non esistevano, dato che non c'era un business dietro), secondo voi, intendeva creare un'altro wargame, oppure aveva in mente qualcosa di diverso?

dalla copertina della white box: "Rules for fantastic medieval wargame"

dalla prefazione, riportata anche nelle edizioni successive: "From the CHAINMAIL fantasy rules he drew ideas for a far more complex and exciting game, and thus began a campaign which still thrives as of this writing! In due course the news reached my ears, and the result is what you have in your hands at this moment. While the C & C Society is no longer, its spirit lives on, and we believe that all wargamers who are interested in the medieval period, not just fantasy buffs, will enjoy playing DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS"

paragonare il gioco per alcune sue meccaniche prese in prestito da un wargame, mi sembra quantomeno sciocco

non è stato paragonato ad un wargame, è stato detto che derivando da un wargame è quantomeno ovvio che preveda di combattere e non di scappare dai mostri.

laddove il combattimento necessita di una meccanica, di una serie di regole che lo disciplinino, per le interazioni non ce n'è assolutamente bisogno

sono sicuro che Ben Lehman non sarebbe d'accordo con questa tua affermazione. Le regole servono a gestire gli eventi che riteniamo importanti all'interno del gioco e questo non è solo un principio di game designer ma di buon senso. Chiunque, anche un bambino, se volesse fare delle regole per... nascondino, non svilupperà un sistema di combattimento ma un sistema che gestisca gli aspetti legati al nascondersi.

E' peraltro fittizio credere che un gioco come, ad esempio, la 3a edizione e i due cloni 3.5 e pathfinder, abbiano all'interno una meccanica che disciplina le interazioni fra personaggi, dato che la cosiddetta CD viene scelta dal master, in base a ciò che ritiene corretto per l'occasione

la meccanica non è delle migliori né è particolarmente approfondita segno che la diplomazia non è lo scopo centrale del gioco (che infatti resta il combattimento) ma tuttavia c'è e la CD non viene scelta in base "all'occasione" ma in base alla disposizione iniziale del nemico. Che poi i DM facciano un pò come vogliono è un altro discorso che comunque non cambia il concetto.

Quello che trovavo interessante nel suo commento, e in quelli a seguire che avevano postato, era invece il fatto che quella logica di tentare di evitare lo scontro, è venuta a mancare totalmente nelle nuove edizioni

tentare di evitare lo scontro è una cosa che si fa meglio e più spesso nelle nuove edizioni, per quanto in modo secondario rispetto al combattere

Infine, giusto per far capire quanto sia inutile (e a volte controproducente, come per le abilità intimidire/raggirare o peggio per l'onnipresente percezione) inserire regole per qualsiasi evento si ritenga importante in gioco, non mi risulta esistano ad esempio strumenti per gestire il commercio di qualsiasi tipo, neppure spesso a livello di ambientazione.

Eppure, tutti i pg prima o poi comprano qualcosa...

una cosa è comprare qualcosa, un'altra il commercio. Non ci sono regole sul commercio perché D&D non parla di mercanti (e anzi, l'economia fa acqua da tutte le parti). Invece ci sono regole per comprare qualcosa e cioè ci sono i prezzi di acquisto degli oggetti (principalmente armi e armature), ci sono i prezzi di vendita (50%), ci sono regole per stimare il valore di un oggetto (appraise), ci sono regole per sapere cosa viene venduto e comprato in una data città (limite in mo). Sono regole semplici perché il gioco non consiste nel mercanteggiare ma nel combattere.

Quindi come stavo dicendo si riconferma:

l'argomento è principale al gioco? molte regole approfondite e con molte opzioni

l'argomento è secondario al gioco? qualche regola poco approfondita

l'argomento è terziario? appena qualche regoletta qua e là, magari opzionale

l'argomento non è previsto? praticamente nessuna regola

commerciare in 3.5? non pervisto => nessuna regola.

Comprare/vendere in 3.5? terziario => poche regolette semplici (lista dei prezzi)

svicolare, fregare il mostro in BD&D? terziario => poche regolette semplici

svicolare, fregare il mostro in 3.5? secondaria => qualche regola poco approfondita

combattere in qualsiasi edizione? primario => sono 3/4 del manuale

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ecco Ji Ji ha detto quello che avrei voluto dire io se avessi avuto più tempo e la possibilità di fare qualche ricerca.

Sottoscrivo in toto.

Quando ho tempo vorrei anche postare i post di Luke crane a cui fa riferimento Ji Ji (se lo fa qualcun altro ben venga). Anche quelli sono interessanti. Diciamo che quando mi sono avvicinato a d&d è proprio quel tipo di gioco che mi ha affascinato (e infatti non sopportavo vampiri :) ) .

Inviato dal mio MK16i con Tapatalk 2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, stavolta cercherò di essere un pò più chiaro e logico nell'esposizione.

in tutti e tre i casi il discorso non cambia: si vede perfettamente che il gioco è stato fatto per affrontare combattimenti e non certo per evitarli, visto che ci sono regole molte per combattere (giuste o errate che siano) e nessuna (o quasi) per evitarli.

O si accetta che la mortalità elevata e il reward sistem siano errori feature o si accetta che tutte le altre regole siano errori.

Ti rendi conto della contraddizione di quanto stai dicendo? Se non ci sono (o quasi) regole per evitare gli scontri, la tua ipotesi che mortalità elevata+reward system siano errori e le altre regole siano corrette o viceversa, non sta in piedi, dato che tu stesso dici che "tutte le altre regole" non esistono (o quasi).

Mentre non ho mai accennato all'elevata mortalità, che sicuramente c'è così come anche in cthulhu ad esempio, ho proprio affermato che la tua idea che sia TROPPA è sbagliata, e continuare a portare avanti un'ipotesi su un TUO percepito del gioco, è un dogma: è così perchè lo dici tu, non perchè lo è veramente, di fatto lo puntualizzi qui, il tuo modo di vedere

per altri quella mortalità sarà divertente e quindi combatteranno senza farsi problemi a cambiare Pg ogni 3x2

in nessuno dei tre casi prevedi che l'elevata mortalità sia un incentivo ai giocatori e una cosa piacevole perchè RIESCONO AD EVITARE di morire: per te è difatto una cosa impossibile, esattamente quello che Ben Lehman nei suoi commenti seguenti indirizza nei confronti dei giocatori post '90 (dall'uscita della 3, per essere chiari).

il gioco è mortale => quindi non era pensato per combattere, dice lui.

You do not want to get into a fight. Particularly as a 1st level character, fights will kill you dead. Every single attack roll has a fairly decent chance of killing you. Thus, you want to avoid being subject to attack rolls, by whatever means.

e ancora

As a player of modern (tabletop or video) games, this can be a hard adaptation to make. You have been trained through long experience to "clean out" dungeons and to treat combat as a resource expenditure (spend some hit points to pass the monster) rather than an out-and-out losing condition. However, D&D is not a game of resource management nearly as much as it is a game of creativity. Creatively navigating your environment is the only possible key to success.

La differenza fra le affermazioni che gli attribuisci e quelle che fa lui sono abbastanza evidenti: non dice MAI che il gioco non è pensato per il combattimento, ma invece spiega (e lo fa meglio più avanti) che è necessario individuare QUALI combattimenti fare e COME farli, ovvero supplire alla mancanza di forza necessaria nei primi livelli, con stratagemmi adatti all'occasione.

Un bel pò diverso da dire semplicemente che D&D non è pensato per i combattimenti: appunto essendo ispirato a wargames, è un gioco di tattica e strategia, quella utile nel trovare dei vantaggi per pareggiare uno scontro impari.

intendeva creare un'altro wargame, oppure aveva in mente qualcosa di diverso?

we believe that all wargamers who are interested in the medieval period, not just fantasy buffs, will enjoy playing DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS"

Qui hai solo evidenti difficoltà sia con l'inglese che con l'italiano.

combattere in qualsiasi edizione? primario => sono 3/4 del manuale

Curioso come il manuale non dica che bisogna effettuare combattimenti per 3/4 delle sessioni, o peggio che il combattimento debba essere pari a 3/4 della durata della campagna che si svolge.

Ancora: trovami un modo nelle edizioni dalla 3 in poi, per sfuggire ad un combattimento, che siano inclusi nelle regole, e che non prevedano l'uso della magia: se non sei in grado di muoverti più del nemico, e questi è più forte di te, non puoi sfuggirgli nella maggioranza dei casi (cosa che risulterebbe inutile tra l'altro, visto che gli scontri sono creati sulla base di un ipotetico livello/GS, per cui già si sa che il party è in grado di superare l'ostacolo, magari a costo di grandi risorse e FORSE di qualche vittima..)

Infine: perchè sorvoli sempre sul fatto che 40 anni fa, i games designer come li conosciamo oggi, non esistevano praticamente, e sicuramente non avevano centinaia di giochi di quel tipo realizzati, da cui trarre spunto, ma anzi, ancora una volta continui a dire che chi ha creato D&D è un game designer con nessun buon senso?

Passiamo ad una riflessione più seria e meno polemica.

Nel moderno panorama dei GDR, si ha la tendenza ad assimilare l'interazione fra PG e PNG ad uno scontro. In molti sistemi di regole si parla apertamente di conflitti sia che si parli di combattimento, che dell'interazione nel mondo fra vari elementi "vivi".

Di fatto, dalla creazione di abilità come quelle presenti dalla 3a edizione in poi, quello che era una sezione di gioco dedicata all'interpretazione, viene incasellata in una nuova forma di combattimento, più fluida e semplice.

I tiri contrapposti, le abilità, un livello iniziale di difficoltà da cui cominciare, sono le stesse meccaniche che stanno dietro ad un combattimento: uso una delle capacità del PG per affrontare l'avversario e ridurlo alla ragione, è un concetto unico che si può applicare sia ad un riempirlo di mazzate, che ad intimidirlo.

Di nuovo quindi si intravede la dicotomia di cui parlava Ben Lehman, perfino appunto nelle interazioni. Si è passati da un non porre regole per gestire il gioco di ruolo e l'interpretazione, ad un inserimento delle stesse per facilitare i giocatori e i master in erba, che possono così gestire le situazioni di scontro avendo in mano uno strumento, senza il bisogno di porsi domande o valutare altre possibilità, ossia RIMUOVENDO almeno in parte il valore interpretativo/ruolistico.

E' sufficiente pensare a situazioni in cui l'interpretazione cozza paurosamente col risultato di dado o con le necessità di storia, per capire quanto questo sistema sia artefatto. Immaginiamo il solito ladro che tenta di estorcere informazioni riguardo la missione a qualcuno che le ha.

Nel vecchio D&D avremmo avuto modo di pensare ad una serie di possibilità per ottenere le informazioni: rapire il tizio e minacciarlo, venire a conoscenza di qualcosa che può danneggiarlo e quindi ricattarlo, persuaderlo con le buone, corromperlo e via dicendo.

Evidentemente, alcune di queste opzioni funzioneranno al 100% e altre allo 0%, e il funzionamento non dipenderà in alcuni casi neppure dalla bravura oratoria del personaggio: se il PNG ha assassinato qualcuno, una volta minacciato di far sapere la cosa, darà sicuramente le informazioni al PG, viceversa provate a corrompere un inquisitore e constaterete di persona quanto siano umide le sale di tortura sotterranee del tempio.

Con le nuove regole invece, si può semplicemente demandare il tutto al dado ( date un'occhiata alle regole postate sopra da thondar e ditemi dove c'è scritto che è NECESSARIO ruolare la scena per ottenere il risultato voluto): il ladro ha ottimo intimidire, un carisma alto, per cui riuscirà nella sua impresa indipendentemente dalle sue pretese o da quelle del PNG, infatti sono previsti al tiro di dado solo due effetti, fallire o avere successo in base all'abilità.

Si crea anche un'ulteriore situazione orribile dove addirittura si può immaginare un'ottima interpretazione del ladro di cui sopra, precedente un pessimo tiro di dado. Il master potrebbe dare un bonus al PG, ma nel caso questo fosse insufficiente, il PG potrebbe avere mille argomentazioni valide ma il suo sarebbe sempre un insuccesso, perfino nel caso del PNG assassino che descrivevo sopra.

Ovviamente, il master potrebbe decidere per un insuccesso in qualsiasi caso o per un successo al 100% se l'interpretazione del PG è davvero così ottima, ma così si va contro la regola, e quindi ecco spiegata l'assurdità della stessa.

Quanto spiegato nell'articolo, per finire, trova applicazione quindi anche nel caso di interazioni non di combattimento.

Il personaggio che una volta avrebbe cercato informazioni riguardo un certo PNG per ottenere da quest'ultimo qualcosa, avrebbe giocato di ruolo (mi piace iniziare a fare differenza fra gdr e interpretazione, mi sto convincendo che sono fondamentalmente due cose molto distinte), ossia avrebbe evitato lo scontro con il PNG tramite un diverso approccio all'ostacolo, esattamente come potrebbe fare un PG durante il combattimento, sfruttando gli oggetti nelle stanze, un equipaggiamento buono, inventiva e altro: carpendo un segreto su un PNG, in definitiva, si compie un'azione molto simile al trarre un mostro in una trappola piazzata in precedenza.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Secondo me come detto prima le abilita sociali le hanno messe solo per giustificare l'esistenza della sta carisma a parte fare qualche cosa di particolare non faceva altro (certi si lagnano che il carisma nella 3.X senza determinate condizioni come le sue regole particolari non vada da nessuna parte ma nelle vecchie edizioni era trattato anche peggio) ma sul fatto delr aggiara gli scontri questa opzione hai giocatori tanti la scordano per la semplice avidità di PX ed anche per quella dell'incontro causale che in gioco dove c'e la regola dei GS ed menate varie di non far affrontare certi mostri hai pg ma con quella regola si rompe tale cosa.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Vorsen, attenzione, non è del tutto vero che il carisma sia una stat uscita dal cappello con la 3.5...in advanced era questo:

http://www.seads.org/TSR/phbbk.htm

e col pacchetto player's option diventa questo

http://spillklubben.samfunnet.no/Filer/ad&dbooks/players%20option%20-%20skills%20and%20powers.pdf

La differenza ovviamente va ricercata nelle abilità a cui il carisma da un bonus nel check.

Se qualcuno in Italia si fosse disturbato a dare un'occhiata approfondita a quei tre manuali neri, avrebbe scoperto che dalla 3 in poi, han copiato spudoratamente da quel sistema.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

lo so che il carisma esisteva già nell'OD&D ma alla fine serviva solo per due cose puzze cioè attrarre seguaci ed i tiri di reazione ma con il passare del tempo ed delle edizioni fra classi che c'e hanno come stat primaria,abilita,talenti,ecc la hanno reso più utile ma se non usano tali "regole particolari" tutti considerano tale stat inutile se paragonata alle altre non sto scherzando purtroppo,seno perché avrebbe tali "regole particolari" risposto ad altre stat che sono già più utili anche senza di esse?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.